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the islamist threats confronting america. today, americans simply do not have what washington called the right understanding of the threats from the persian gulf region. in my writings i thought to acquaint americans with the nature of these threats. whether from iran in its a religion is in iraq and lebanon, the vicious martial anti-christian, anti-jewish and anti-western brand of islam is theology exporter under saudi arabia's official, or the forces of osama bin laden, al qaeda and other sunnis islamists lead and insight. and i also argued that the united states government under both parties is fighting an islamist enemy that does not exist. and, therefore, it is a policy that runs counter to america's historical traditions, and so to its best interests. official washington islamist enemy is the stuff of hollywood farce. beat a shia or sunni, the islamists are a limited band of fanatic nihilists, ready to kill widely and indiscriminately for the pure joy of murdering. and ready to sacrifice their lives because my daughters go to university, i went hold early presidential primaries every fou
, i do believe that america is exceptional, but i think it's important to examine the facts carefully to figure out just where we stand in today's world. america is indisputably number one by some key measures. we have the world's largest economy, military, scientist establishment, the biggest technology companies. we are just as indisputably falling behind in many other key areas. well behind other countries. let's take a look at some recent rankings. the united states is the fourth most competitive country in the world economically. good. we're only fifth best country in which to run a business. america's enrollment rate for elementary school, however, ranks 79th in the world. we're only 12th in the percentage of college graduates among rich countries. america's 15-year-olds are ranked 19th in science and 24th in math. our infrastructure ranks 23rd. we're 41st in the world on infant mortality, 49th on life expectancy. perhaps most worrying, america is no longer a place where anyone can make it. last year the oecs issued a study of social mobility across generations, basically that's
a different america. >> major burris this leaders on how new york regained a major position. >> with wall street's reemergence, wall street was pulled into the global economy and became america's gateway to that economy, and has prospered ever since. >> watched the interview sunday night on c-span. >> the consumer federation of america have a summit meeting in washington, d.c. this week. the subject of one panel was how communication has changed with the presence of the internet, mobile devices, and social networking. also covered, online privacy. experts from microsoft and a rise in to play -- took part in this one hour, 20 minute event. >> i think we're going to get started for this morning's panel. it is entitled "the future of consumer communications." we're glad to hear your critics see you here on a friday morning. no place better to be at this panel talking about this issue. in recent years, we have seen an explosion in growth of devices that consumers use and the way that the uses them, whether facebook, twitter, video. more and more consumers use devices in different ways to acce
are in it. we better be in it to win it. if there is doubt we get out. win it means gadhafi goes and america gets to get out of there. and let the people of why create their own government. choose their own leader. and america, no nation building, we get out, we take care of our affairs elsewhere. >> greta: one he steps down. two he goes into exile and leaves libya and three he is captured and stands trial and four he's killed. which should be the goal? >> i think gadhafi is going to end up dead through this mission. whether it is at the hands of the rebels who have turned on him. or whether it is at the hands of america and her allies as we are engaged in in no-fly zone. which again, seems to be turning into much more. i think at the end of the day gadhafi is not gonna go willingly. >> greta: is it a failure on our part if we turnover command and control to someone else to nato or france or whatever. and gadhafi is still in power s that a failure on our part? >> america will have failed. -- if we turnover command and control of this mission and the mission of ousting gadhafi is not fulfille
is in south america, but it's considered part of the caribbean, and they came to cut, to work on sugar plantations. so part of what fascinated us was what is this substance where someone in be his family -- in his family all the way in russia, a serf, and someone in my family looking to get a better life over here in india and then over to the caribbean, what is this substance that could effect people from such different parking lots of the world? -- parts of the world? >> and before we trace that out, we want to ask you a question. how many of you think you might have sugar somewhere in your family background? so that's one, two, three -- oh, man, yes! yes! >> all right. what i'm going to do, i just want to hear from a couple of you where your family might have been from, okay? >> well, i think my family might have been in the caribbean -- >> caribbean. >> okay, absolutely. >> okay, very good. okay? >> i feel my family was either in the caribbean or in europe. >> very good. >> okay, okay. >> i think my family was either in the caribbean or europe. >> okay. very good. anybody else here
and declining america and a declining europe. how do you make money and create jobs? it is a complicated and scary place. it is more creative and i will do it for clients and the more honest than a where do you live? >> i live in germany will have my head office. the dutch government is one of my clients. >> why would somebody hire you? >> i have a unique background. i have been educated in europe. i understand europeans. i lived and worked in washington. i'm a member of the council on foreign relations and i work for the center for strategic international studies. i worked at the heritage foundation on the right and the council is in the middle. i know the points of view of the schools of thought in washington. >> were was, originally? >> ohio, and a good ohioan, a place called rocky river. >> why the cato institute? >> why the cato institute? >> they let the politics fall where they fall. they have been deeply unfashionable. they say we have to have a foreign policy within our means. eisenhower is my favorite modern president. it would ruin our domestic equilibrium, we will not be a gr
what it is like to live in the new world, declining america, declining europe. how do you make money and create jobs? it is a very complicated, scary place. bhay did is what they did in bhay did is what they did in washington. but it's more creative and you can do it actually for clients and be a little bit more honest about it. brian: where do you live? >> i spend most of my time living in germany. one of my clients is the dutch government. i spend time in the hague as well but most of the time in germany. brian: why would someone hire you? >> i have a unique background. educated in the u.k., so i understand europeans but i lived and worked in washington. i worked for the heritage foundation on the right and the council is in the middle so i know the points of view of every major school of thought in washington so that's a good reason to hire me. brian: where was home originally? >> ohio. a place called rocky river about an hour from cleveland. i had an idyllic, eisenhower childhood it was lovely. i go back to that, pocketbook issues are what matter to a lot of people. and in foreig
budget crises of their own leading to angry protests about the future role of unions in america. and throughout the world uprisings in north africa and the middle east sending oil prices surging. stephen moore joins me now. one issue at a time. >> okay. >> when these protests in state capitols subside, will unions, which have been weakened over the last 30 years in america, will they come out stronger or weaker? >> well, i don't view this as an assault against the unions but i do think this is a really important fight for the future of finances of state and local governments across the country. one of the things i try to tell viewers is this isn't just about wisconsin. what's happening in madison. this is about what is likely to happen in many, many states if they don't get their public pensions and their public health care under control. and so i think the stakes are really high here, ali. i think in the end that these legislate tours are going to do the right thing. >> sorry, do the right thing, do the right thing, you mean go ahead with these plans that some people call union
behaviors led to the subprime crisis. >> host: when you talk about what we've done wrong in america and other western nations as well, part of it is we live for today. we consume. we go for the free lunch. elaborate on that. >> guest: yeah, i think what we're also facing in places like the united states is the competition or the sort of test between the current generation and the future generation. we have to decide whether there are going to be sacrifices which are what i'm arguing in the book, sacrifices for people today so that the united states tomorrow can remain a preimminent economic power. clearly, there were promises made, pensions is a classic example of this that a unsustainable. it's impossible to fulfill those promises and the question then becomes how much of a sacrifice are people willing to make today in the united states to make sure that tomorrow we can have educated, a reasonably educated public and infrastructure and so on. >> host: what happens if we don't make the sacrifice? that's your warning in the book. because we're on a wrong path and short termism and co
. >> host: when you talk about what was done wrong in america and other western nations as well, part of it is that we live for today, we go for the free lunch. the elaborate on that. >> host: i think what we are also facing right now in places like the united states is the competition over the sort of test between the current generation and the future generation. we have to decide whether there are going to be sacrifices which is what i'm arguing in the book, sacrifice is for people to face of the united states tomorrow can remain a preeminent economic power. clearly there were promises that were made, pensions is an example but is unsustainable and it is going to be impossible to fulfil the promises and so the question then becomes how much of a sacrifice are people willing to meet today in the united states to make sure that tomorrow we can have a reasonably educated population and the infrastructure and so on. >> host: what happens if we don't make the sacrifice because that is your warning in the book that because we are on this wrong path and because they're seems to be this sho
. why is he suing cbs? >>> and made in america. a family is stunned when we go through their house searching for u.s. products. all about creating more american jobs. >>> good evening. we begin tonight with a u.s. exclusive, moammar gadhafi. the flamboyant and brutal dictator at the center of the firestorm in libya. today our christiane amanpour became the only american reporter to sit with gadhafi. he refused to acknowledge libyan protesters. he laughed at demands that he step down, even as anti-government forces rage across his country. so let's go right away to christiane in tripoli. good evening, christiane. you sat right across from the man. the whole world is wondering what he'll do next. what did you hear? reporter: well, diane, i see he was relaxed and focused, determined to tell his side of the story. he exhibited no sense of a siege mentality. on the other hand, he remains incapable of realizing that in this country there is an uprising against him. colonel gadhafi emerged from the first of a convoy of cars, greeting us at a beachfront restaurant as the sun set over the m
, national farmers union, crop life for america and responsible industry for a sound environment. mr. speaker, i want to thank my colleague, chairman smid for her leadership and -- scmidt and thank the ranking members on the subcommittees for their support of the bill. i want to thank chairman mica and rahall for their leadership as well as chairman lucas and ranking member petter son of the agriculture committee. i urge all members to support h.r. 872 and i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. bishop: mr. speaker, in light of the fact that mr. baca yielded back the balance of his time to me, can you tell me how much time is left on this side? the speaker pro tempore: 15 minutes remaining. mr. bishop: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from oregon, mr. defazio. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from oregon is recognized. mr. defazio: we are here pretending to do something about a real problem. we are amending the wrong statute at the wrong time under the guise that this is a crisis and bringing
to viewers about that. i nt with a to quickly remind you about a cnn in america special, the fight over the construction of a mosque in the heart of the bible belt. called unwelcome, the muslims next door. debut sunday march 27th at 8:00 p.m. >>> these are not live pictures, this is from earlier. remember the standoff over the budget repair bill that was going to strip workers of bargaining rights, last night the state senate republicans passed the bill on their own after taking out a few fiscal provisions that required a larger quorum. this is how it's going over. not at all well with union members and teachers and other critics and majority lawmakers. late this morning police moved into lock the capitol down. you can see there seems to be a sit-in of some point. they wanteded to clear the protester out, ahead of the vote front of the final assembly which was supposed to happen an hour ago. the wisconsin bill would let public employees negotiate only their wages, not working condition or anything else that a typical union can negotiate. limit pay raises to the inflation rate unless the
and in america over budgets and politics. nick kristof back from the middle east. eliot spitzer familiar with the problems of balancing budgets. david frum. chrystia freeland. what in the world. we found a nation even more divided than our own. finally we'll take a last look at the ultimate mubarak bling. i'll explain. now, there's an interesting debate about whether the events in the middle east are good for the united states, the west, good for peace and stability, but i think there can be little dispute about whom they are bad for. al qaeda. in fact the arab revolts of 2011 represent a total repudiation of al qaeda's founding ideology. think about it. for 20 years al qaeda has said that the regimes of the arab world and massive dictatorships and the only way to overthrow them is to support al qaeda and its terrorism. then in a few weeks the people of the arab world have overturned two governments by means of nonviolent demonstrations and begun a process reform and revolution that will alter the basic bargain between the ruler and ruled in the middle east. al qaeda insisted that people
reporter on the scene with even more heavy rain on the way. >>> and, made in america. the newest challenge in the middle of grand central station. and an even bigger reveal. the new jobs being sown in the u.s. right now. >>> good evening. not long ago, a cancer diagnosis felt like a death sentence. not anymore. huge numbers of americans, hundreds of thousands more each year, are surviving and living with cancer. numbers just released from the centers for disease control show that 1 in 20 american adults is now a cancer survivor, almost 12 million of us. we are catching cancer earlier and treating it more effectively. and ron claiborne is here with what it all means for the survivors and the people that love them. this is such encouraging news. >> reporter: this is really important news tonight, george. so many people are now living with and beating cancer. four times as many as 40 years ago. in fact, the cdc said today that for millions of americans, cancer is now a manageable disease. >> reporter: they send us their videos. poignant messages celebrating their struggle against cancer. toda
that america is watching and we can ill afford for the governor to start implementing measures -- i guess i'm shooting myself in the foot. it's coming to maryland on the 14th. i expect to see some of those young socialist-communist in the background when i watch msnbc to be standing at the rally, if i go at all. they would love to see him recall. if they do, the rest of america will fall behind him. host: next is a democrat in ohio. what do you think? who was the winner and loser in wisconsin? caller: i think the loser is the middle class. the gentleman who was just on is just a case of how the middle class is pitted against each other. huge tax breaks are given to people who make huge amounts of money and middle-class people are arguing amongst each other about things we should not be able to -- we should not have to argue about. people were properly taxed like they're supposed to be, they would not be having these arguments. i'm not saying that we should not have a competitive business community, but come on. they are making huge amounts of money. i say go on wisconsin. wisconsin is showi
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its financial strength to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america." on the run -- muammar gaddafi's minister has defective while rebels are running away from a government offensive on the ground. >> we have to join the rebel forces falling back. they manage to go a short distance up the road before we came under fire. >> hanging on -- the president of assyria offers a defiant response against his rule and his of -- his security forces set out to enforce it. and a billion fans as india and pakistan face-off in cricket's the stakes go well beyond the playing field. >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. just a few weeks ago, the rebels in libya appeared to hav
against drug smugglers. >>> "america at the crossroads." tonight why america's losing some of the best and brightest and how to keep them here. >>> and tired of it all. alarming news about a problem that impairs our economy, our health, our jobs, actually puts us in danger. health, our jobs, actually puts us in danger. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. the president of the united states is now on record. the longtime libyan leader needs to leave and change must now come to libya. this is how the president put it at the white house today. >> let me just be very unambiguous about this. colonel gadhafi needs to step down from power and leave. that is good for his country. it is good for his people. it's the right thing to do. >> of course, that brings us to the question about how to do that, how to finish what the libyan uprising has started. there's growing support for a so-called no-fly zone, but the defense secretary continues to warn americans that would first mean a u.s. air attack on libya. moammar gadhafi has lost control of
intensely about america getting weaker. when i'm in america i talk about europe. where you aren't, you talk about the other guy. i have a unique point of view. brian: so give us a scenario where the dutch government is using your expertise. do you go to them? write for them? talk to them on the phone? >> i work at a thirving tank called the centre for strategic studies. the dutch government funds my work there, half comes from the hague and half from the dutch government. they call me up and say explain the tea party. we all talk like we understand it but nobody really does. what is the philosophy about this? what is driving this? rather than read a newspaper of a european guessing, that's a great example. brian: do they ever ask you to come to washington and lobby for them? >> no. i would never do that. one of the great things about this is i can do and say what i thought. i wanted to say what i thought was empirically the truth and if you are your own boss you can do that and you have to be able to say no to any client. that's the is hing point. i can say and do what i wish. i would never
is a mean-spirited bill that will cut the heart out of the recovery we have in america today. it goes after little children, poor little boys and girls who want to learn -- they don't know what they want, but we want them to learn to read, to be able to learn something. head start is a program that has been successful. we have a lot of poor people in nevada. i wish we didn't but we do. head start has been something that has been great for our community. national institutes of health, they're whacking of that. national science foundation. our clean energy jobs, they're going after that. national laboratories. where is the spirit of pete domenici? pete domenici, longtime republican senator, he and i worked as chair and ranking member of the energy and water subcommittee on appropriations trying to fund those very important labs. the labs do lots of good things. among other things, they make our country, nuclear weapons safe and reliable. what has been done with this meat ax approach that they say is only numbers is not good for our country. i've heard my friend, the assistant majority leader,
to america were very on. six or seven years old. how was adaptation to america? >> i will answer the first question briefly. first of all, because adding 120 could 40 or 45 tremendously impressive men. the prime minister comment engineer, the diplomat convinced britain they are of many accomplishments. how did they survive this strenuous journey to america? talking about doing lead in the 19th century, here is how it fits. sitting around the dinner table if you want to beat you better know what you want to eat in english. if you do not know that you will not get it. they learn english very fast. [laughter] >> they were like 20 years buy the time they got to china, they were very young and have all the menial tasks. it took a good 10 years to come into their own as men. but they really did make a difference because they really were presented and what ever realm of life of the country they were being mining, engineering, telecom mining, engineering, telecommun, navy, brought a fresh spirit and self confident attitude that made a great change that by the way is what i see everywhere today in
to thank the state of hawaii and the hawaiian national guard who helped us respond to the america samoa when the tsunami hit there. the challenges, again, as we know, in the pacific, the distances require us to both leverage what we have in the fema warehouses, but also our close coordination with paycom, pacific command and their resources. nancy ward, you point out, one of our regional administrators, starts to talk with counter parts in hawaii or in the territories, in the event we see something coming, again, we know the distances, we know we can't wait. we are looking at how we'll start to ship or fly resources in. this is the close coordination we have, the ability to charter aircraft and work with the department of defense for those most critical supplies. as you remember in america samoa, one of the key issues the governor had was generators and couldn't wait for them to come by barge because he had to get his critical systems back up. so we were able to task initially d.o.d. and later extractors to fly the generators in there. it goes back to the authorities. this can be vested
unmet. i talked about reducing america's dependence on oil when i was running for president. i am proud of the historic problem -- progress we have made towards that goal. we will talk about that in a little bit. i have to be honest. we run into the same political gridlock, the seema inertia that has held us back for decades. that has to change. that has to change. we cannot keep going from shock when gas prices go up to a trance when they go back down. we go back to what we are doing until there is a price spike and then we are shocked again. we cannot rush to propose action when gas prices are high and hit the snooze button when they fall. we cannot keep on doing that. the united states of america cannot afford to buy that our long term prosperity, our long- term security on a resource that will eventually run out. even before runs out, we will get more expensive -- it will get more expensive to extract from the ground. we cannot afford it when the cost is so high. not when you're generation needs to get this right. it is time to do what we can to secure our energy future. and today,
from indiana, mr. burton, talk about these critical issues for the united states of america. and each of us as they have come down here on so many days come down here to bring up these critical issues, informing you, mr. speaker. while that's going on there are people all across america that are listening in and deciding for themselves the priorities and deciding for themselves what kind of a job we're doing here in congress. and i'm here -- i'd love to step in on the immigration debate and burn up about 30 minutes talking about that, but, mr. speaker, i think to start out with -- i need to have this discussion with you about obamacare. and there's a fair number of different strategies that are working here in the house of representatives and perhaps a different number and a different strategy to some degree going on in the united states senate. but the circumstances are this -- almost a year ago obamacare passed the united states congress and was message to the president where he eagerly signed the bill. it was a combination of legislative shenanigans that took place. the bill that c
. three major areas of concern emerged from the discussion. the america invents act addresses each one of them. first, there is significant concern about delays in pat tent application process. pat tent and trademark office, p.t.o., currently has a backlog of more than 700,000 unexamined patent applications. now, there are several reasons for this, not the least of which is the p.t.o. is overwhelmed with patent applications and doesn't have the resources necessary to get through that backlog. the director of the p.t.o. obvious says that the next great invention that's going to drive our economic recovery may be waiting on a shelf waiting to be granted. our act will authorize the p.t.o. to set its fees. we want them to work through the backlog, we want them to be current. and i want to commend austin goodwills bee, the chair of the president's economic advisors. his speech on the importance of patent reform show that we need it to help america win the global competition and create jobs. we should be doing all we can to help the p.t.o. director. now, it makes no sense that it takes two y
atlanta a better city. georgia a better state, and america a better country. just how, i do not know but i have the faith to believe it will. and if i am right, then our suffering is not in vain. .. >> before we get started, i wanted to mention the upcoming events that includes james carroll on march 11 with his new book, and unger on april 4 more "american tempest: how the tea party sparked a revolution." others include billy collins and governor duvall patrick. you can find more information in the events flier. after the talk this afternoon, there's time for questions after which there's a book signing at the table, and you can get signed copies up at the registers. when you know you buy a book from the harvard bookstore, you're supporting a local institution who cares about books, and this author series would not be possible without that support. we are pleased to have c-span's here recording for book tv. if you have a question, wait for the microphone to come to you before asking your question. now is a good time to make sure you silenced your cell phones. this afternoon, i'm pleased t
pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will receive a message. the messenger: madam speaker, a message from the senate. the secretary: madam speaker. the speaker pro tempore: madam secretary. the secretary: i have been directed by the senate to inform the house that the senate has passed s. 23, to amend title 35, united states code, to provide for patent reform in which the concurrence of the house is requested. the speaker pro tempore: after consultation among the speaker and the majority and minority leaders and with their consent, the chair announces that when the two houses meet in joint meeting to hear an address by the honorable julia gillard, prime minister of australia, only the doors immediately opposite the speaker and those immediately to his left and right will be open. no one will be allowed on the floor of the house who does not have the privilege of the floor of the house. due to the large attendance that
champion of u.s. engagement in latin america and did an excellent job as my husband's on boy during the clinton administration. i think -- my husband's on vvoy during the clinton administration. this is an ideal place to discuss what i see as one of the central strategic opportunities for the united states today. obviously, there is a lot going on around the world. there is much that demands are urgent attention from the historic changes in the middle east and north africa to the tragedy unfolding in japan. as i often say, we have to deal with both the urgent and the important at the same time. with president obama departing for resilience in just a few hours, -- for brazilia and just a few hours, this is the time to consider another important part of the world. the president's trip coincides with the anniversary of a major milestone in hemispheric relations. 50 years ago, president kennedy launched the alliance for progress, pledging that the united states would join with latin american leaders to address head-on a development challenge that was, as he put it, staggering in its dim
." >>> this is "bbc world news america." outgunned and ill-equipped, libyan rebels are on the run. >> we have to join the rebel forces pulling back. they managed to go a short distance up the road before we came under fire. >> hanging on, syria's president and his security forces set out to enforce it. and a million fans are mesmerized as india and pakistan face-off in the world cup. >>> well, on pbs in america and around the globe. it's just a few days ago, it seemed that the rebels had the upper hand in libya. now they are on the run. such is the fickle nature of the war. they say without continued help from western powers, the opposition cannot overthrow the government. following coalition air strikes, the rebels had been moving from their town of benghazi, but now have lost a town. >> revolution 101. beginners lessons in using a rocket-propelled grenade. but there is more guesswork and expertise. it the rebels want more weapons, and the international community is suggesting they may not get them, but what is missing here is training and leadership -- the international committee is suggesting they
'll see top to bottom coverage right here on cnn. i also want to draw your attention to a cnn in america special, "unwelcome: the muslims next door." soledad o'brien chronicles the dramatic fight over the building of a mosque in the heart of the bible belt. her special report airs sunday, march 27th at 8:00 p.m. eastern only on cnn. >>> on to other stories now, starting with the libyan civil war. pro-government troops appear to have taken on bin jawad. medical sources tell cnn at least five people were killed there yesterday. and air strike today targeted the main road into ras lanuf. an oil town that remains in the control of the opposition. in fact, many of the pipes, the pipelines in libya, lead to ras lanuf and shipped out. opposition forces responded with anti-aircraft fire. witnesses tell cnn that opposition forces also remain in control of misrata. seeing it here. a doctor says at least 42 people were killed there on sunday. >>> a supreme court ruling announced today gives a texas death row inmate another chance to prove his innocence. in a 6-3 decision, the court ruled that dna e
's, and the largest fireworks display ever seen in america. generations of new yorkers commemorated november 25th as evacuation day, an anniversary that of the folded into the more enduring november celebration of national togetherness, that is giving day. what if you had not wanted the british to leave? mixed in among a happy new york crowd there were other less cheerful faces. colonists who had sided with british, the departure spelled lawrie. during the war tens of thousands of loyalists had moved for safety into new york and of the british held cities. the british withdrawal raised urgent questions about their future. what kind of treatment could they expect? jailed, attacked, retain their property or hold on to their jobs? confronting real doubts of their lives, liberty, and potential for happiness in the united states, 60,000 loyalists decided to take their chances and follow the british elsewhere into the british empire. it took 16,000 black slaves with them bringing the total exodus to 75,000 people or about one in 40 members of the american population. it travel to canada, sell for brita
of america is business. two saturdays ago, i was at south by southwest, a very exciting activity that takes place in austin, texas, it not only promotes the live music industry, which is huge in austin, live music capital of the world, but in addition, it promotes entrepreneurship among people with new, great ideas. and those new, great idea people, all -- i talk to them, they are so excited. such great young people. many of them in the high tech industry but in all the industries. those young people sat there and told me the one thing you can do that would hurt us the most is tax stock options and put up regulations that would prevent me doing what i need to do in my project. so if the government will stay out of my way and if you won't impose taxes on the very source of investment money that i'm seeking as a new entrepreneur, if you don't do those two things and you stay out of the way, i've got an idea that can change this country. and many of them have just those ideas. some of the things we have now like facebook, those things like they made a movie about and all that stuff, all that w
>> this is "bbc world news america." on the run -- muammar gaddafi's minister has defective while rebels are running away from a government offensive on the ground. >> we have to join the rebel forces falling back. they manage to go a short distance up the road before we came under fire. >> hanging on -- the president of assyria offers a defiant response against his rule and his of -- his security forces set out to enforce it. and a billion fans as india and pakistan face-off in cricket's world cup. the stakes go well beyond the playing field. >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. just a few weeks ago, the rebels in libya appeared to have the upper hand and now they are on the run. such is the fickle nature of this war. speaking of a fickle, and appears muammar gaddafi's foreign minister has given up on his boss. he made his way to the u.k. today. rebel forces had been heading west from their stronghold in benghazi. but now they have lost the town of brega. we begin the coverage from further down the coast. >> revolution 101 -- beginners' of lessons in
satellite corp. 2011] >> everywhere and europe and and america, your people agree with it. the whole people are against you. your governments, your regime will go down. host: a defiant response just two hours ago from libyan leader gaddafi as missiles continue to hit key targets overnight. 48 deaths were reported. this is the largest international military effort since the iraq war. today's military action taking place the same weekend egyptian residence are going to the polls to vote on the senate -- is changes to its constitution. voters in haiti going to the polls to select a new president. our president and rio de janeiro, day to bureau of his south american trip where his focus is on jobs, trade, and the economy, and congress is in recess. we are going to focus on the story from libya. and your calls and reaction as u.s. and allies strike those targets. 202-737-0002, our line for democrats. 202-737-0001 for republicans. for independence, the number to call is 202-628-0205. here are some of the headlines from domestic newspapers beginning with "new york post." "take that gaddafi." "stri
effective for pain and sleeplessness. motrin pm. and here's what we did today in homes all across america: we created the electricity that powered the alarm clocks and brewed the coffee. we heated the bathwater and gave kelly a cleaner ride to school. cooked the cube steaks and steamed the veggies. entertained dad, and mom, and a neighbor or two. kept watch on the house when they slept. and tomorrow we could do even more. we're cleaner, domestic, abundant and ready now. we're america's natural gas. the smarter power today. learn more at like many chefs today, i feel the best approach to food is to keep it whole for better nutrition. and that's what they do with great grains cereal. see the seam on the wheat grain? same as on the flake. because great grains steams and bakes the actual whole grain. now check out the other guy's flake. hello, no seam. because it's more processed. now, which do you suppose has better nutrition for you? mmm. great grains. the whole whole grain cereal. >>> in just about an hour, president obama will be taking a few questions the first time since u.s. b
] >> and dealing with america's terrorist enemies, i said that our tax dollars should pay for weapons to stop them, not lawyers to defend them. [applause] >> and you know what, the default position of the local machine is always to brush off political republican candidates who are running for office is as right wing nuts. well, this time it was different. it didn't fly in massachusetts. and under a short time before the final debate, i remember like it was yesterday, on a bitter cold night, as cold as it is here, this is tropical, come on. i shook hands, i actually went outside, it probably was, had to have been 10 or 20 below zero. it was cold. it was a cold night, but they were out there holding signs for each other. and i went outside and i shook hands with everybody, including those people who were supporting my opponent. they were mostly union guys and they would say scott, scott, we are voting for you. [laughter] >> yeah, we're here because we're getting paid to hold these signs. [laughter] >> we are voting for you, yes. well, that assure a confidence builder for the debate that i was having
housing america and liberty nor safety are both with outside publishers. but we do both. >> thank you very much for your time. >> thank you so much. ♪ >> up next, booktv presents "after words," an hourlong program where we invite guest hosts to interview authors. peter firstbrook explores the history of the paternal side of president obama's family in his new book, "the obamas." .. >> host: in some sense we might expect your book to be called the untold story of an american family, but it's the untold story of an african family. why did you choose to focus on the side of the family heritage and what is its significance. >> guest: when the american people elect a president they also elect the leader of the free world. you only have to see what's happening this week in cairo to know that the decisions made now in the white house are going to affect the lives of 85 million egyptians. and so i sometimes think the american people don't fully appreciate just a big a deal it is when there's a new american president because he does have this very powerful influential position for the re
history. we'll talk about whether this makes any sense. >> biggest company in america, biggest employer in america, now maybe the biggest lawsuit in america. interesting stuff. >>> now to our top story tonight -- with everything happening in libya, it's been days since we've talked about japan. but i have to tell you tonight, the situation there is perhaps more critical than it has been at any point since that terrible earthquake and tsunami almost three weeks ago. most experts now believe three of the six reactors have had partial meltdowns, again, three meltdowns. there are just 500 workers there waging a heroic battle to limit the scope this ongoing catastrophe. workers are cut off from the world, working 12-hour shifts in hazardous, potentially lethal conditions. they often sleep on leaded mats to protect them from radiation. there's little food available, some workers are said to be living on crackers. listen to this e-mail sent by one of the workers -- "crying is useless. if we're in hell now, all we can do is crawl up toward heaven." many of these workers come from the region har
a lesser america to the next and trillions in unpaid bills. a new report from the government accounting office documents what we instinctively have known, waste and duplication in government cost taxpayers billions of dollars every year. early estimates say between $100 billion and $200 billion. and experts say we could save tens of billions of dollars by aggressively prosecuting health care, waste and abuse, just as we saved millions of dollars going after health care fraud when i was attorney general. the people of connecticut, indeed of america, will not tolerate and should not tolerate billions in waste and duplication. it must be cut. that's where we should focus. not on the thoughtless slashing of essential services that provide a safety net for our most vulnerable citizens. when we cut, let's be smart about it. the people of connecticut are sick of the special breaks and tax loopholes that have been protected for far too long, tax breaks to companies that send jobs overseas, subsidies to huge oil and gas interests; some of them the most profitable companies in the history of the
display ever seen and north america. generations of new yorkers commemorated november 25th as the evacuation day, an anniversary that was later folded into the more enduring november celebration of the national togetherness, thanksgiving day. but what if you hadn't wanted the british to leave? mixed in among the had the new york crowd that november day, there were other less cheerful faces. for loyalists, colonists who sided with britain during the war, the departure of the british troops felt worried, not jubilation. during the war, tens of thousands of loyalists moved for safety into new york and other british help cities. the british withdrawal now resurgent questions about their future. what kind of treatment could expect in the new united states? would they be jailed, would they be attacked, but they retain their property or hold onto their jobs? confronting real doubts about their lives, liberty and potential happiness in the united states, 60,000 loyalists decided to take their chances and follow the british elsewhere in to the british empire. they took 15,000 black
, military operation. if america can't do this, if america leaves gadhafi in power, american will look weaker until the region. >> gadhafi must go was said many times by this president and yet this mission is not intent on bringing him down. so i guess the question is -- >> let's just break that fiction right now. that is a fiction. do they not know, mark halperin, inside the white house that they have to drive him from power now for the reasons i stated. because if he stays in power, we've got a very angry man with oil money who will use it to kill americans on u.s. soil. because all of these people that wanted to rush in and said we have to go in and start a war with a third muslim power. this is what they have set loose. >> i agree. at this point there's no other alternative or outcome that's acceptable for america's interest in the region. but it's not a sure thing that he can be driven from power or that if he is driven from power that the vacuum that's left is to american's advantage. it's a dangerous line that's been krosd but it has been crossed. >> the inten is the humanitarian, the
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